Weblog on the Internet and public policy, journalism, virtual community, and more from David Brake, a Canadian academic, consultant and journalist
27 September 2010
Filed under:Academia,Personal,Privacy,Weblogs at11:37 am

I have argued in my thesis (and hope to argue at greater length in book form) that protection of online privacy in practice is not simply a matter of offering the right controls but for users is a complicated balancing of different priorities and values. I would like to chronicle my children’s lives online for a select audience of friends and family but it’s not clear where and how I should do it.

Livejournal offers good privacy controls so I tried using that but I couldn’t get enough of the people I wanted to be able to read it to sign up and remember their passwords and visit.

Facebook now has enough of my desired audience on it to make it worthwhile to publish there and it does allow me to make sophisticated choices about who can read any status update I post, which makes it convenient, but it is also more or less transient (one can read updates well into the past but getting to them is not easy). I would like what I write to remain private but easily accessible and archived.

For me the best security solution so far for pictures and video has been Picasa’s which provides ‘good enough’ security through obscurity (non-search-indexed and un-guessable URLs but doesn’t require visitors to register to view.

What would probably be ideal for me is if there were a blog platform that to enable me to blog semi-securely Picasa-style and more securely (on a post by post basis) to friends who are registered using Facebook Connect or Google Accounts (which most of my would-be viewers have). Any free solutions like that out there?


  1. I haven’t tripped over a blogging solution recently that *doesn’t* support Facebook Connect. It’s even available as a plugin for this blog 🙂

    Comment by Harald — 27 September 2010 @ 1:41 pm

  2. Ah but unless I have misread (http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2009/09/14/how-to-integrate-facebook-with-wordpress/), the plugin for FB connect for WordPress is mainly to allow people to authenticate to write comments or to better post their blog postings on FB rather than to enable FB users easily to authenticate themselves to be able to read specific posts aimed at particular friend groups.

    Comment by David Brake — 27 September 2010 @ 2:16 pm

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URL

Leave a comment